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Department of Human Services

State Plan

The State Disability Inclusion Plan is available in Easy Read, plain text and PDF.

Acknowledgement of Country

Acknowledgement of Country

The South Australian Government acknowledges and respects Aboriginal people as the State’s first people and recognises their traditional relationship with Country.

We acknowledge that the spiritual, social, cultural and economic practices of Aboriginal people come from their traditional lands and waters, and that the cultural and heritage beliefs, languages and laws are still of importance today.

Minister's message

Minister's message

I am proud to deliver South Australia’s first State Disability Inclusion Plan – Inclusive SA – established as part of the Disability Inclusion Act 2018 (SA).

South Australians living with disability and those in the service delivery sector have experienced their largest ever reforms with the recent full transition to the National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS). While around 30,000 people are now receiving supports, one in five report living with disability in South Australia, highlighting the importance of inclusion planning.

In this new era of disability service delivery, development of the state plan has provided the opportunity to consult with members of the community with lived experience, in order to learn more about how the State Government can foster inclusion and accessibility in new ways. I am grateful to the many hundreds of South Australians who contributed to the consultation process through forums, emails, phone calls and online discussions.

Inclusive SA paves the way for a whole-of-government approach to inclusion, and I look forward to continuing the team effort required to bring about the necessary changes. Inclusivity benefits all South Australians, and together with local councils and State Government agencies, we are committed to delivering the economic and social benefits of a more inclusive state.

Michelle Lensink MLC
Minister for Human Services

Inclusive SA

Inclusive SA

It is time for the State Government to lead by example and work to improve access and inclusion for people with disability. Inclusive SA is our commitment to create a more inclusive South Australia. It is our first State Disability Inclusion Plan and it will bring State Government agencies and local councils together to reduce the barriers faced by people living with disability.

In 2018, the Disability Inclusion Act 2018 (SA) was passed because we recognised that a stronger commitment was needed. This plan, and the Disability Access and Inclusion Plans (DAIPs) that State Government agencies and local councils will develop, will help ensure that new strategies address barriers and promote positive action.

Inclusive SA sets out specific actions for State Government agencies and local councils (‘State authorities’) to achieve. These will support the implementation of the National Disability Strategy 2010–2020 (NDS) and the principles agreed in the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (UNCRPD). Inclusive SA also complements the NDIS, as it aims to address access and inclusion for all South Australians living with disability, including people who are not NDIS participants.

While Inclusive SA sets the focus for the next four years, it is also a living document that will respond to shifting priorities and new information, as governments across Australia are working together to design a new national disability strategy for 2020 and beyond. Inclusive SA will also be updated to reflect social, political and environmental changes as well as any response to recommendations made by the Royal Commission into Violence, Abuse, Neglect and Exploitation of People with Disability. A revised plan will be published in 2021.

Community consultation

Community consultation

More than 300 enthusiastic people generated around one thousand ideas to help us develop Inclusive SA. The community shared examples of good practice and discussed where improvements could be made. People with lived experience of disability provided valuable input into the themes and priorities.

Working together, participants told us that people living with disability want to:

  • be treated with respect and dignity
  • find meaning in their lives
  • make their own decisions
  • be actively involved in their communities
  • live somewhere that feels like home
  • be able to get to places
  • receive an education
  • work
  • feel safe
  • have fun
  • make friends
  • be connected and informed
  • understand their rights
  • have access to the services they need.

Participants in the community consultation considered the specific situations of people from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples, women and children. The actions in this plan take those considerations into account. Further and more targeted consultation with these priority groups will take place during 2020 to ensure the revised plan in 2021 responds to their specific needs.

You can read more about what we heard during consultation in the consultation report.

Principles

Principles

Principles are values that guide behaviour and create a shared understanding about what is important. This plan is based on the following principles for people living with disability:

  • fundamental human rights, responsibility and autonomy
  • individual worth and dignity
  • participation in social and economic life
  • the right to realise physical, social, sexual, reproductive, emotional and intellectual capacities
  • the right to make decisions, including supported decisions, and to take risks
  • access to information in appropriate forms
  • respect for cultural or linguistic diversity, age, gender, sexual orientation and religious beliefs
  • rights to privacy and confidentiality
  • live free from neglect, abuse and exploitation
  • rights to pursue complaints and access justice
  • acknowledge and respect the crucial role of families, carers and significant persons
  • freedom of association and support to engage in family, social and friendship activities
  • respect the needs and rights of children as they develop
  • acknowledge and respect the abilities, strengths, goals and needs of people living with disability.

Vision

Vision

Our vision is an accessible and inclusive South Australia based on fairness and respect.

To achieve this vision, Inclusive SA focuses on the following themes:

  • Inclusive communities for all
  • Leadership and collaboration
  • Accessible communities
  • Learning and employment.

Inclusive communities for all

Inclusive communities for all

Social inclusion is a priority for people living with disability as it affects all aspects of their lives. It is our aim that the contributions and rights of people living with disability are valued and understood by all South Australians and that their rights are promoted, upheld and protected. We also want to ensure that people living with disability are supported to advocate for their own rights.

Key words

Social inclusion, rights, community education and awareness, involvement in community.

‘I’ statements

  • I am understood and valued
  • I am included in the community
  • I know my rights

Priority 1: Involvement in the community

Actions

  1. Develop an event toolkit to promote accessible and inclusive practices for State authorities in community events.
  2. Explore the redesign or creation of an app (or other medium) that displays existing and future services and facilities (such as toilets, eateries, sports and recreation facilities, parks and trails, arts organisations and cultural institutions, transport services, beaches that are wheelchair and disability-access friendly).
  3. Develop and promote inclusive play guidelines to guide local councils and other community groups in the development of accessible and inclusive playgrounds and play spaces.
  4. Collaborate with relevant organisations to run disability access and inclusion awareness training for arts organisations, cultural institutions, sporting organisations and clubs.
  5. Explore opportunities to increase the involvement of children with disability in sports and cultural activities, for example:
    • expanding the Sports Voucher program for children living with disability
    • providing extra support for children living with disability to participate in VACSWIM
    • promoting the availability of arts programs for children living with disability.

Priority 2: Improving community understanding and awareness

Actions

  1. Work with relevant State authorities to improve community understanding and awareness that complements and leverages the national effort under the National Disability Strategy 2010–2020 and the emerging national disability strategy for beyond 2020.
  2. Work with the Commonwealth Government to develop data indicators that measure changes in community attitudes about the rights and needs of people living with disability.

Priority 3: Promoting the rights of people living with disability

Actions

  1. Review disability awareness training packages within State Government agencies, including public health settings, to establish best practice and implement for new and existing employees.
  2. Ensure induction of new State authority employees includes information about working with people living with disability.

Quotes from the consultation

Everyone has a responsibility to make our community inclusive.
Fun is underrated.
Attitudinal changes are key to making physical changes and removing barriers.

Being inclusive — Grants SA: Disability Inclusion, Department of Human Services

Disability inclusion has been included as a priority area within Grants SA funding rounds for 2019–20 to support innovation and opportunity for people living with disability.

The types of activities that may be considered to support disability inclusion include:

  • the development of meaningful volunteer pathways
  • programs in regional and rural communities
  • improving wellbeing
  • improving access to community centres, venues and social/support groups
  • ensuring resources and communications are accessible
  • investing in volunteer training and education.

Leadership and collaboration

Leadership and collaboration

People living with disability want to have a greater role in leading and contributing to government and community decision-making. It is our aim that the perspectives of people living with disability are actively sought and that they are supported to participate meaningfully in government and community consultation and engagement activities.

Key words

Participation, decision-making, engagement, consultation, leadership.

‘I’ statements

  • I am truly valued
  • I can take action
  • I can make my own life choices

Priority 4: Participation in decision-making

Action

  1. Share the learnings of the improved Supported Decision-Making approach for people living in State Government accommodation services with State authorities.
  2. State authorities to support young people living with disability to actively participate in decision-making.

Priority 5: Leadership and raising profile

Action

  1. Develop a communications strategy to promote BoardingCall, the South Australian Government recruitment register for boards and committees, to ensure it is promoted to people living with disability.
  2. Ensure high quality and co-ordinated engagement with the Royal Commission into Violence, Abuse, Neglect and Exploitation of People with Disability, including providing consistent, accurate and relevant information, through a dedicated response unit led by the Attorney-General’s Department.

Priority 6: Engagement and consultation

Actions

  1. Develop a toolkit that supports State authorities to consult and engage with people living with disability when developing policies and programs, which:
    • promotes and explains co-design principles
    • focuses on supports for consultation within regional South Australia.
  2. Review the function of the Disability Engagement Group to:
    • ensure membership is focused on people living with disability and carers
    • increase membership in rural and regional areas
    • increase the use of the Disability Engagement Group members in decision-making and policy initiatives
    • support members to develop advisory and leadership skills.

Quotes from the consultation

If you can get young people with disabilities used to being involved in decision-making, that would be a great step.
Saying people were part of the discussion is not sufficient; the involvement must extend into the decision-making.

Accessible communities

Accessible communities

The accessibility of the built environment, quality services and information is key to ensuring people living with disability are included and have the opportunity to equally participate in all aspects of community life. It is our aim to increase accessibility to public and community infrastructure, transport, services, information, sport and recreation and the greater community.

Key words

Built environment, Universal Design, health, wellness, access to services, transport, housing, belonging, community.

‘I’ statements

  • I can live the life I want in my community
  • I am included and can access everything I need
  • I can access the information I need

Priority 7: Universal Design across South Australia

Actions

  1. Elevate the design quality of South Australia’s built environment and public realms through promoting design quality policy and the principles of Universal Design.
  2. Explore the feasibility of adopting Universal Design procedures across State Government (as currently used by the Department of the Premier and Cabinet) in the design, construction, maintenance and procurement of all workplace environments, customer environments, systems, intranets and websites, and programs and policies. This will include:
    • applying Universal Design principles to sport and recreation infrastructure projects to support family-friendly and accessible facilities
    • considering Universal Design principles in infrastructure works and maintenance across the Department for Environment and Water managed land, infrastructure and parks
    • adopting Liveable Housing Australia design guidelines for all new-build social housing stock
    • considering incorporating Universal Design principles in residential construction and maintenance specifications for SA Housing Authority houses
    • improving access for people living with disability in the redevelopment of the Sir Samuel Way and Supreme Court buildings.
  3. Contribute to the national conversation on the possibility of introducing Silver or Gold-level Liveable Housing standards for all new housing to be applied through the National Construction Code from 2022.
  4. Local council access and inclusion planning to consider consultation outcomes including:
    • incorporating Universal Design principles in criteria for all new building and public projects and planning for programs, services and events
    • developing Universal Design training plans for staff and contractors
    • review of availability of accessible car parks.

Priority 8: Accessible and available information

Actions

  1. Create the Inclusive SA website (and consider other communication media) to provide key resources for people living with disability and the community to raise awareness about disability.
  2. Develop a toolkit to support State authorities to ensure communication about their services is available in a range of accessible formats. These may include easy read, Auslan, pictorial forms, large font, audible options, Braille, closed captions and VoiceOver.
  3. Improve online accessibility of State Government websites, including through implementation of the Online Accessibility Policy and related guidelines.

Priority 9: Access to services

Actions

  1. Continue to work collaboratively with the Commonwealth Government and the National Disability Insurance Agency (NDIA) to develop strategies to support a diverse disability workforce, including within regional South Australia.
  2. Further develop Auslan interpreter capacity (by drawing on people with lived experience).
  3. Develop and promote a toolkit for signage, wayfinding and multimedia devices for State authorities to support deaf, hard of hearing, blind, vision-impaired or hearing-impaired persons.
  4. State authorities to consider including in their infrastructure maintenance and upgrade schedules the installation of signs on the front of public buildings indicating disability access (where this has been assessed by an accredited access consultant) and installation of multimedia devices in queues at service outlets to include people who are deaf, hard of hearing, vision-impaired or blind.
  5. Implement the Canine Court Companion pilot project to provide increased practical support and assistance to vulnerable victims and prosecution witnesses involved with the Office of the Director of Public Prosecutions (ODPP).
  6. Continue to work with the Commonwealth Government to reform the Disability Standards for Accessible Public Transport 2002.
  7. Ensure the state-owned bus fleet is accessible, including disability awareness training for frontline public transport staff and the consideration of voice systems in buses that notify people of the next stop.
  8. Promote liaison and communication links between health services and disability support services, and improve the continuity of supports, including psychosocial supports, during hospitalisation.
  9. Consider establishing minimum standards for priority parks and reserves (including coasts, heritage places and Crown land) that improve access and inclusion for people living with disability and implement a program of priority actions, including exemplar visitor experiences.

Quotes from the consultation

Educate the community about ABILITY.
Everyone has different abilities. Make sure everyone has the opportunity to use their abilities.

Being inclusive —State Sports Park, Office for Recreation, Sport and Racing

The development of the new wind tunnel facility at State Sports Park will provide world class training facilities for elite and developing athletes and para-athletes.

Being inclusive — Glenthorne National Park, Department for Environment and Water

The State Government is creating Glenthorne National Park in Adelaide’s southern suburbs. This new park is being developed using Universal Design principles and will be accessible and inclusive for the entire community. It will showcase the principles of Healthy Parks Healthy People – a partnership between the community, the Department for Environment and Water and Department for Health and Ageing that aims to improve our health and wellbeing through quality green space.

Being inclusive — Accessible website solution offered to all South Australian Government agencies, Department of the Premier and Cabinet

Audited by Vision Australia and user tested by Royal Society for the Blind (SA), Website Design System offers all South Australian Government agencies an accessible website solution through the Office for Digital Government, Department of the Premier and Cabinet. With increased accessibility as the reason for the development of government websites, Website Design System now provides agencies with a base website made up from over 30 modules built to the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG AA). Each module is managed centrally. Upgrades and accessibility updates are developed, tested and deployed once at the top level. They then cascade to all sites. Supported by South Australian Government’s Online Accessibility Toolkit, solutions like Website Design System are highly valuable for digital inclusion as it now means inclusion is part of the planning stages for digital resources. It is no longer a costly afterthought.

Being inclusive — Disability Housing, SA Housing Authority

The SA Housing Authority built 100 disability homes, many with bespoke designs to meet the specific needs of individual households. The disability housing, which was built to standards incorporating Universal Design and Liveable Housing Australia design guidelines, has now been completed and transferred to community housing providers to manage.

Learning and employment

Learning and employment

Workforce participation is fundamental to social inclusion. It provides economic independence and choice, social connections and friendships, value, identity and belonging. It is our aim that people living with disability have access to inclusive places of study and that education and training provides pathways to meaningful and inclusive employment and volunteering opportunities.

Key words

Employment, education, volunteering, learning, training, ability, flexibility.

‘I’ statements

  • I can make the most of my abilities
  • I can contribute and know my contribution is valued
  • I can have a fair go

Priority 10: Better supports within educational and training settings

Actions

  1. State education and training sectors to support inclusive education culture and practices.
  2. State education authorities to work in partnership with children, students, parents or carers, industries and the community to provide curriculum and learning opportunities that are personalised and tailored to the individual, and prepare students for life beyond school.
  3. Determine data required to measure and track the percentage of people living with disability participating and achieving in education and training.

Priority 11: Skill development through volunteering and support in navigating the pathway between learning and earning

Actions

  1. Explore how pathways can be improved from education and training settings to post-learning.
  2. State authorities to facilitate meaningful volunteering opportunities for people living with disability.

Priority 12: Improved access to employment opportunities and better support within workplaces

Actions

  1. Support and promote the implementation of the Office of the Commissioner for Public Sector Employment’s Public Sector Employment Strategy across the public sector.
  2. Increase employment opportunities across all levels in the South Australian public sector through the targeting of job opportunities for people living with disability under section 65 of the Public Sector Act 2009 (SA) which provides for employment opportunity programs.
  3. Develop data measures to track the percentage of people living with disability employed and retained in State authorities.

Quotes from the consultation

Trust that we can do it.
I want people living with disability to be given opportunities just like any other person in terms of education, employment, physical access, etc.

Being inclusive — Access for children on the autism spectrum, SA Museum

Museums can be loud and overwhelming places for children on the autism spectrum. As part of the South Australian Museum’s Building a Culture of Access Program, the museum has implemented autism-friendly family mornings. During these mornings, children on the autism spectrum can visit the museum with their families outside of regular opening hours. By making small adjustments within the museum, such as altering sound and light levels and setting up quiet spaces, a sensory-friendly experience is created, improving access for people with disability in the community.

Ensuring Inclusive SA makes a difference

Ensuring Inclusive SA makes a difference

We want Inclusive SA to generate meaningful change and we also recognise there is still a lot of work ahead.

Achieving our vision will take time, extensive collaboration and ongoing reflection. This is why consultation with the community will continue, giving us the opportunity to adapt to the evolving needs of people living with disability.

Over the next year, each State authority will be developing their own Disability Access and Inclusion Plans (DAIPs) and be responsible for reporting annually. To ensure synergy across local councils and State Government agencies, each DAIP will align to the priority areas set out in Inclusive SA.

To map our progress, we will use an initial set of interim measures (Appendix 1), while we develop an outcomes framework that will align with the new national disability strategy for beyond 2020. We will also report on our progress each year.

Appendix 1: Interim measures

Appendix 1: Interim measures

Our vision is an accessible and inclusive South Australia based on fairness and respect.

To map our progress, we will use the interim measures below as we work towards developing an outcomes framework that aligns with the new national disability strategy for beyond 2020. The interim measures include indicators that are contained within existing data sources. We will continue to adapt current sources and develop new indicators in consultation with our stakeholders.

Inclusive communities for all — interim measures

PriorityOutcome Trend Indicators [1]

1. Involvement in the community

People living with disability actively participate in welcoming and inclusive communities

Proportion of people with disability participating in community support/social groups[2]

Proportion of people with disability participating in common cultural and recreational activities groups

2. Improving community understanding and awareness

The South Australian community is aware of and understands the barriers to access and inclusion faced by people living with disability

For future development as part of outcomes framework

3. Promoting the rights of people living with   disability

People living with disability have their rights promoted, upheld and protected

For future development as part of outcomes framework

[1] The trend indicators are taken from the Australian Bureau of Statistics General Social Survey or Survey of Disability, Ageing and Carers. Further indicators will be established as part of the development of the outcomes framework for the new national disability strategy for beyond 2020.

[2] Community support or social groups refer to active involvement in a service club, welfare organisation, education and training, parenting/children/youth, sport or physical recreation group, arts or heritage group, religious or spiritual group, craft/recreation/special interest group or social club.

Leadership and collaboration — interim measures

PriorityOutcome Trend Indicators

4. Participation in decision-making

The perspectives of people living with disability are actively sought and they are supported to participate meaningfully in government and community decision-making

Percentage of people living with disability actively involved in governance/civic groups [3]

5. Leadership and raising profile

People living with disability hold positions of leadership and responsibility across all sectors

For future development as part of outcomes framework

6. Engagement and consultation

Consultation and engagement practices across State Government support people living with disability to influence decisions that affect their lives

For future development as part of outcomes framework

[3] Civic participation refers to involvement in a union, professional association, political party, environmental or animal welfare group, human and civil rights group, or body corporate or tenants association.

Accessible communities — interim measures

PriorityOutcome Trend Indicators

7. Universal Design across South Australia

Built environments and public spaces are accessible to people living with disability

For future development as part of outcomes framework

8. Accessible and available information

People living with disability can access available information that is inclusive and accessible

For future development as part of outcomes framework

9. Access to services

People living with disability have access to the services and supports they need

Access to general practitioners, dental and other primary healthcare professionals for people with disability

Learning and employment — interim measures

PriorityOutcome Trend Indicators

10. Better supports within educational and training settings

People living with disability have access to inclusive education and training opportunities

Educational achievement of people with disability

11. Skill development through volunteering and support in navigating the pathway between learning and earning

People living with disability have opportunities to develop their skills through volunteering, learning and employment

Proportion of people aged 15–64 with disability with non-school qualification

Proportion of people with disability with post-school qualification

12. Improved access to employment opportunities and better support within workplaces

People living with disability have opportunities to develop and succeed in flexible and sustainable employment

Proportion of people with disability participating in the labour-force

Proportion of people with disability in both private and public sector employment

Appendix 2: Words and acronyms used

Appendix 2: Words and acronyms used

Best practice

A method or technique that has been generally accepted as superior to any alternatives because it produces results that are better than those achieved by other means or because it has become a standard way of doing things.

Built environment

Man-made structures, features and facilities viewed collectively as an environment in which people live and work.

Co-design

A range of activities and processes used in the design of services and products that involve people who use or are affected by that service or product.

Commonwealth

The government of the Commonwealth of Australia – commonly referred to as the Australian Government or the Federal Government.

DAIP

Disability Access and Inclusion Plan prepared by State authorities for their own agency, department or council area.

Data indicators

A specific, observable and measurable set of information that can be used to show changes or progress being made toward achieving a specific outcome.

DHS

The South Australian Department of Human Services.

Disability Engagement Group

A DHS-led register which can be used by other government agencies or councils to obtain advice from people with disability and the sector about disability issues.

Local councils

A system of government in South Australia under which elected local government bodies (councils) are constituted under the Local Government Act 1999 (SA).

NDIA

National Disability Insurance Agency.

NDIS

National Disability Insurance Scheme.

NDS

National Disability Strategy 2010–2020 — the strategy is a shared commitment by all governments to work together to improve the lives of Australians with disability by guiding governments and other organisations to build the wellbeing of people with disability and their carers.

National Disability Strategy for 2020 and beyond

The National Disability Strategy that will replace the existing National Disability Strategy 2010–2020.

State authority

As defined in the Disability Inclusion Act 2018 (SA) to include a government department, an agency or instrumentality of the Crown, a local council constituted under the Local Government Act 1999 (SA) or any other person or body declared by regulations to be included.

Supported decision-making

A model for supporting people with disability to make significant decisions and exercise their legal capacity.

Toolkit

A suite of information documents which may include guidelines, templates and procedures, to assist in the completion of a task.

UNCRPD

United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities — the convention is a human rights treaty that aims to change attitudes and approaches to people with disability. It reaffirms that all people with disability must enjoy human rights and fundamental freedoms.

Universal Design

Universal Design involves creating facilities, built environments, products and services that can be used by people of all abilities, to the greatest extent possible, without adaptations.

Chinese Simplified / 简体中文

 

如果您想让人用您的语言(如普通话、粤语等)给您解释有关南澳残疾人包容计划的内容,请致电传译及翻译中心,电话号码:1800 280 203(按第 2选项),然后要求传译员接通公众服务部的电话。

 

这是一项免费服务。

 

 

 

دری Dari /

 

اگر می خواهید که برنامۀ شمول معلولیت این ایالت به زبان دری برای شما توضیح داده شود، لطفاً به مرکز ترجمه شفاهی و کتبی به شمارۀ 203 280 1800 زنگ بزنید (گزینه 2 را انتخاب کنید) و ترجمان بخواهید تا با وزارت خدمات انسانی تماس بگیرد.

 

این خدمات ترجمانی بدون کدام مصرف در دسترس شما است.

 

 

Khmer / ខ្មែរ

ប្រសិនបើអ្នកចង់ឱ្យគេពន្យល់ជូនអ្នក អំពីផែនការដាក់បញ្ចូលជនពិការភាពថ្នាក់រដ្ឋជាភាសាខ្មែរ សូមទូរស័ព្ទមក មជ្ឈមណ្ឌលបកប្រែភាសានិយាយ និងសរសេរ លេខ 1800 280 203 (ជ្រើសរើសជម្រើសទី 2) ហើយស្នើសុំ អ្នកបកប្រែភាសា ដើម្បីទាក់ទងមកក្រសួងសេវាកម្មមនុស្ស។

សេវាកម្មបកប្រែនេះ មានផ្តល់ជូនអ្នកដោយឥតគិតថ្លៃ។

 

 

Serbian / Српски

Ако желите да Вам се “Државни план за укључивање особа са инвалидитетом“ образложи на српском језику, молимо Вас назовите преводилачку службу Interpreting and Translating Centre на телефон број 1800 280 203 (одаберите опцију 2) и тражите да српски преводилац контактира Department of Human Services. (Министарство за социјалну заштиту).

Ова услуга превођења Вам је доступна бесплатно.

 

Vietnamese / Tiếng Việt

 

Nếu quý vị muốn được giải thích về Kế Hoạch Hội Nhập của Tiểu Bang dành cho Người Khuyết Tật (State Disability Inclusion Plan) bằng Tiếng Việt, vui lòng gọi điện thoại cho Trung Tâm Thông Phiên Dịch theo số 1800 280 203 (chọn số 2) và yêu cầu một thông dịch viên liên hệ với Bộ Dịch Vụ Nhân Sinh (Department of Human Services).

 

Dịch vụ thông dịch này được cung cấp cho quý vị miễn phí.

 

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Provided by:
SA Department for Human Services
URL:
https://dhs.sa.gov.au/services/disability/inclusive-sa/state-plan
Last Updated:
05 Jul 2018
Printed on:
18 Nov 2019
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